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Court orders

Can the court order me to go to jail before my trial?

Yes, the court can order you to spend time in custodyBeing held in custody means that you're not free to go. You might be held in custody by the police. For example, you're in police custody if the police arrest you and are taking you to the police station. Or, the court might order that you be held in custody. This might happen if you're found guilty and sentenced to stay in a youth custody facility, which is often called jail.X before deciding whether you're guilty. This is called "pre-trial detention".

This could happen if:

The Crown attorneyThe Crown attorney, who is sometimes called a prosecutor, is a lawyer who presents the case against you in court.X also has to prove that you need to be held in custodyBeing held in custody means that you're not free to go. You might be held in custody by the police. For example, you're in police custody if the police arrest you and are taking you to the police station. Or, the court might order that you be held in custody. This might happen if you're found guilty and sentenced to stay in a youth custody facility, which is often called jail.X :

They must also show that there are no options other than custodyBeing held in custody means that you're not free to go. You might be held in custody by the police. For example, you're in police custody if the police arrest you and are taking you to the police station. Or, the court might order that you be held in custody. This might happen if you're found guilty and sentenced to stay in a youth custody facility, which is often called jail.X that will work.

If you're held in custodyBeing held in custody means that you're not free to go. You might be held in custody by the police. For example, you're in police custody if the police arrest you and are taking you to the police station. Or, the court might order that you be held in custody. This might happen if you're found guilty and sentenced to stay in a youth custody facility, which is often called jail.X before your trial, this will usually be somewhere for young people under the age of 18.

(Reviewed August 2015)