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Court orders

What types of orders can be made before or during my trial?

Your trial won't happen right away. And it won't happen the first time you go to court. The judge or justice of the peace will tell you to come back on another date. This can happen more than once.

The court will almost always tell you when to come back until either:

If you think the judge or justice of the peace is letting you go without telling you when to come back, check with your lawyer or the court staff.

You have to show up every time the judge or justice of the peace tells you to, unless your lawyer gets permission to go to court for you.

If you don't show up and your lawyer doesn't go to court for you, you could be charged with a crime.

Bail orders

The most common type of court order that might be made before a trial is a bail order. It's also called a "recognizance order".

This type of order might be made if the police want to keep you in custodyBeing held in custody means that you're not free to go. You might be held in custody by the police. For example, you're in police custody if the police arrest you and are taking you to the police station. Or, the court might order that you be held in custody. This might happen if you're found guilty and sentenced to stay in a youth custody facility, which is often called jail.X after they've arrested you.

The police must take you to court within 24 hours of your arrest. Then a judge or justice of the peace decides whether the police can keep you in custodyBeing held in custody means that you're not free to go. You might be held in custody by the police. For example, you're in police custody if the police arrest you and are taking you to the police station. Or, the court might order that you be held in custody. This might happen if you're found guilty and sentenced to stay in a youth custody facility, which is often called jail.X or if you they must let you go.

There might be rules that you must follow if you're let go. For example, the court might order you to:

If you don't follow these orders, you can be charged with a crime and you might be held in custody until your trial.

(Reviewed August 2015)